Gambling Income and Losses

July 30, 2013

Today we are taking a break from our health care series.  We are going to examine gambling income and losses.

 

Whether you roll the dice, play cards, play the lottery or bet on the ponies, all your winnings are taxable.

 

Gambling income includes winnings from lotteries, raffles, horse races and casinos. It also includes cash and the fair market value of prizes, such as cars and trips.

 

If you win, you may receive a Form W-2G (Certain Gambling Winnings) from the payer. The form reports the amount of your winnings to you and the IRS. The payer issues the form depending on the type of gambling, the amount of winnings, and other factors. You’ll also receive a Form W-2G if the payer withholds federal income tax from your winnings.

 

You must report all your gambling winnings as income on your federal income tax return. This is true even if you don’t receive a Form W-2G.

 

If you’re a casual gambler, report your winnings on the “Other Income” line of your Form 1040, U. S. Individual Income Tax Return.

 

You may deduct your gambling losses on Schedule A, Itemized Deductions. The deduction is limited to the amount of your winnings. You must report your winnings as income and claim your allowable losses separately. You can't reduce your winnings by your losses and report the difference.

 

You must keep accurate records of your gambling activity. This includes items such as receipts, tickets or other documentation. You should also keep a diary or similar record of your activity. Your records should show your winnings separately from your losses.

 

Disclaimer: The items included in the Tax Tip Tuesday Video Blog are informational only and are not meant as tax advice. Consult with your tax advisor to determine how any item applies to your situation. IRS Circular 230 disclosure: To ensure compliance with requirements imposed by the IRS, we inform you that any U.S. federal tax advise contained in this communication (including any attachments) is not intended or written to be used, and cannot be used, for the purpose of (i) avoiding penalties under the Internal Revenue Code or (ii) promoting, marketing or recommending to another party any transaction or matter addressed herein.

 

 

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